Trinity University Press

Books about Landscape

Defiant Gardens: Making Gardens in Wartime

Kenneth I. Helphand (author)

Cover for Defiant Gardens: Making Gardens in Wartime

Why is it that in the midst of a war, one can still find gardens? Wartime gardens are dramatic examples of what landscape architect Kenneth Helphand calls defiant gardens—gardens created in extreme social, political, economic, or cultural conditions. In his examination of the landscape of war, Helphand not only details the surprising occurrence of gardens but also provides an expansive account of the events and forces...

Kenneth Helphand, writes about war gardens—not just victory gardens, grown in time of scarcity, but those planted on hostile fronts, including Eastern Europe's ghettos and...NPR Morning Edition

Home Ground: Language for an American Landscape

Debra Gwartney (editor), Barry Lopez (editor), Molly O’Halloran (illustrations)

Cover for Home Ground: Language for an American Landscape

Have you ever wondered how it came to be called Las Vegas? Or why it was the Natchez Trace, not the Natchez Trail? Or what the difference is between ripples and riffles in a stream? Home Ground brings together, for the first time, the distinctly American vocabulary that people use to characterize the country’s landscape. Forty-five writers, with backgrounds and imaginations as different as journalist Bill McKibben’s...

Home Ground is a treasure house of a book, chocked with gems of the American vernacular. To learn these terms for features of the landscape is like putting on a new pair... — Michael Pollan, author of The Omnivore’s Dilemma

Home Ground: A Guide to the American Landscape

Debra Gwartney (editor), Barry Lopez (editor)

Cover for Home Ground: A Guide to the American Landscape

Hailed by book reviewers as a "masterpiece," "gorgeous and fascinating," and "sheer pleasure," Home Ground was published in fall 2006 in hardcover to outstanding reviews. A language lover's dream, this visionary reference is now in its third edition and has revitalized a descriptive language for the American landscape by combining geography, literature, and folklore in one volume.  Have you ever wondered how it came...

Home Ground is a treasure house of a book, chocked with gems of the American vernacular. To learn these terms for features of the landscape is like putting on a new pair...Michael Pollan, author of The Omnivore’s Dilemma

A Natural History of North American Trees

Donald Culross Peattie (author)

Cover for A Natural History of North American Trees

One in a series of reissued books that have been out of print for decades, by one of the most loved naturalists of all time. "A volume for a lifetime" is how the New Yorker described the first of Donald Culross Peattie's two books about American trees published in the 1950s. In this one-volume edition, modern readers are introduced to one of the best nature writers of the last century. As we read Peattie's eloquent...

Peattie's prose is rich and courtly, the botany illuminating. But the chief delight is how he infuses his short portraits of tree species with the history of a nation.The Denver Post

Places for the Spirit: Traditional African American Gardens

Hilton Als (foreword), Lowry Pei (introduction), Vaughn Sills (photographs)

Cover for Places for the Spirit: Traditional African American Gardens

Places for the Spirit is a stunning collection of more than eighty fine art photographs of African American folk gardens—and their creators—in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina. Through her patient search up and down small-town streets and dusty rural roads, award-winning photographer Vaughn Sills has unearthed an important element of American landscape that is quickly...

Every once in a while, a unique and wonderful book appears. [This] is one of those extraordinary books.Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Terra Antarctica: Looking into the Emptiest Continent

William L. Fox (author)

Cover for Terra Antarctica: Looking into the Emptiest Continent

How do humans turn land into landscape and maps into art? William Fox has worked for more than three decades in the world’s harshest places, and everywhere he goes he has posed these questions in order to understand how we make space into place, and place into home. Now he takes us to the Antarctic, a continent so distant and difficult that everyone who has ever visited it would fit into a single football stadium....

Charts Fox’s three-month stay in the world’s emptiest, coldest, and driest continent—a place where weather reports ‘come in three flavors,’ Conditions Three, Two, and One... — CMC Magazine