Trinity University Press

Books about U.S. Southwest

C. H. Guenther & Son at 150 Years: The Legacy of a Texas Milling Pioneer

Lewis F. Fisher (author)

Cover for C. H. Guenther & Son at 150 Years: The Legacy of a Texas Milling Pioneer

San Antonio-based C. H. Guenther & Son, founded by a young German immigrant in 1851, is the oldest family-owned business in Texas and the oldest continually operated family-owned milling company in the United States. Evolution from waterwheels to computers and from plain flour to mixes and frozen foods form the backdrop to this lavishly illustrated story of a company whose Pioneer and White Wings brands approach...

HemisFair ’68 and the Transformation of San Antonio

Sterlin Holmesly (author)

Cover for HemisFair ’68 and the Transformation of San Antonio

In 1968, a world’s fair sparked a transformation in San Antonio. A monolithic Old Guard overcame four decades of post-Depression lethargy to put on the event, only to find itself overthrown by populist forces unleashed by the new energy. As change rippled outward, rising minority political groups gained a decisive voice in economic developments. In Hemisfair ’68, Holmesly records the HemisFair and post-HemisFair...

For anyone with even a casual interest in local history, this book is an invaluable resource, and some of it is fun to read as well. — San Antonio Express-News

Immigrant Miller Picks Texas: The Letters of Carl Hilmar Guenther

Carl Hilmar Guenther (author)

Cover for Immigrant Miller Picks Texas: The Letters of Carl Hilmar Guenther

The letters in Immigrant Miller Picks Texas describe the odyssey of Carl Hilmar Guenther, who sailed from Germany in 1848 at the age of twenty-two to seek his fortune in America. For two years he tried his hand at construction and factory work in New York, farming and milling in Wisconsin and Ohio, and carpentry on a plantation in Louisiana. Then he learned of opportunities in Texas. In 1851 Guenther built the only...

Land and Light in the American West

Becky Duval Reese (foreword), William R. Thompson (introduction), John Ward (photographs)

Cover for Land and Light in the American West

Ranging in scale from tree bark to the vast emptiness of the desert Southwest, the photographs in Land and Light in the American West provide a visual integration of landscape and ruin, transcendence and decay, that speaks to the powerful forces of nature and culture at work in the West. Inspired by the photography of Eliot Porter and Ansel Adams and their dedication to the natural world, John Ward has been...

It is an inspiration from cover to cover!Apogee

The Plazas of New Mexico

Stefanos Polyzoides (editor), Chris Wilson (editor), Miguel Gandert (photographs)

Cover for The Plazas of New Mexico

The Plazas of New Mexico documents the rich heritage of New Mexico’s public plazas and the everyday life and community celebrations that help sustain them. It traces three distinct design traditions—the Native American center place with kiva and terraced residential blocks, the Hispanic plaza with church and courtyard houses, and the Anglo square with courthouse and business areas. New Mexico’s plazas, like urban...

Meant as a both record of how New Mexican cities developed and as a resource for city planners and architects, The Plazas of New Mexico describes plazas as holders of...Santa Fe Reporter

River of Traps: A New Mexico Mountain Life

Alex Harris (author), William deBuys (author)

Cover for River of Traps: A New Mexico Mountain Life

River of Traps combines words and photographs to tell the story of Jacobo Romero, an oldtime northern New Mexico villager who befriends the authors and initiates them into knowledge of land, water, and a way of life long rooted in the mountain valley that became their common home. Critically acclaimed and widely admired, River of Traps has been justifiably called a western classic.

Anyone who wishes to know [northern New Mexico] can skip the galleries full of pink howling coyotes, stay home and read an exceptional documentary book, River of Traps.New York Times Book Review

Rosita’s Bridge

Mary McMillan Fisher (author), Barbara M. Whitehead (illustrations)

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This is the true story of Carla Maria presenting flowers to her grandmother, singer Rosita Fernandez, when the bridge at San Antonio’s open air Arneson River Theater was named Rosita’s Bridge—not just a bridge across a river but a bridge between cultures.  Rosita tells Carla Maria of immigrating from Mexico in a family of sixteen children, of her father and uncles helping to build the River Walk in the late 1930s,...

Based on a true story . . . this tale focuses on Rosita Fernandez who became known as “San Antonio’s First Lady of Song” during a career that spanned more than 50 years.... — Publishers Weekly

San Antonio: Outpost of Empires

Lewis F. Fisher (author)

Cover for San Antonio: Outpost of Empires

San Antonio’s unique appeal is its colorful, authentic past. San Antonio: Outpost of Empires portrays in words and pictures the evolution of the city over nearly three centuries, from the days of the colonists of New Spain to the defense of the Alamo to the rapid growth of the modern era.  Here the faces of people like Davy Crockett, Robert E. Lee, Theodore Roosevelt, Geronimo, and Queen Elizabeth II mingle with...

A poetic and insightful summary of the city’s origins and development to the present day. . . . Outstanding illustrations bring the author’s written history to life. . . .... — Southwestern Historical Quarterly

San Antonio Legacy: Folklore and Legends of a Diverse People

Donald E. Everett (author), José Cisneros (illustrations)

Cover for San Antonio Legacy: Folklore and Legends of a Diverse People

Frontier San Antonio attracted a great many short-tempered miscreants and adventurers. It also drew missionary priests, conservative merchants, and proper ladies, who established a polite society amid all the commotion. San Antonio Legacy offers their stories, some factual and some less so, often in their own words, from disorder in the Bull’s Head Saloon to hiding silver on wagons to Mexico to the lynching of Bob...

San Antonio on Wheels: The Alamo City Learns to Drive

Hugh Hemphill (author), Red McCombs (foreword)

Cover for San Antonio on Wheels: The Alamo City Learns to Drive

Horseless carriages came to San Antonio to stay in 1899. Mechanized transport—including bicycles—revolutionized the way things moved in the largest city in Texas, though it took a little practice. Following a series of mishaps, in 1910 city council adopted a formal set of driving rules. The speed limit was set at eight miles an hour within one mile of San Fernando Cathedral and at fifteen miles an hour beyond that. ...

San Antonio on Wheels cannot fail to move the heart of anyone who loves his or her car.San Antonio Express-News

San Antonio Portrait

T. R. Fehrenbach (foreword), Mike Osborne (photographs)

Cover for San Antonio Portrait

In San Antonio Portrait, Mike Osborne’s camera captures the architectural and festive spirits of Spain and Mexico that have pervaded the city for nearly three centuries, as he takes a fresh look at treasured historic landmarks and at exciting contemporary additions to the scene. Many of the city’s favorite places, and some of its most festive events, will be recognized quickly. Others may take a bit longer. A foreword...

San Antonio’s Historic Plazas, Parks, and River Walk

Lewis F. Fisher (author)

Cover for San Antonio’s Historic Plazas, Parks, and River Walk

San Antonio enjoys a unique variety of historic public places, from plazas placed in Spanish times to the River Walk, one of the world's most renowned linear parks. In San Antonio’s Historic Plazas, Parks, and River Walk, Lewis F. Fisher organizes 166 full-size vintage postcard images into panoramas displaying the transition of these spaces into modern times. Streetscapes change. Carriages fade away. Candy vendors ply...

School by the River: Ursuline Academy to Southwest School of Art & Craft, 1851-2001

Maria Watson Pfeiffer (author)

Cover for School by the River: Ursuline Academy to Southwest School of Art & Craft, 1851-2001

When seven women of the Order of Saint Ursula and one priest arrived in frontier San Antonio, Texas in 1851 to establish a school for girls, none could predict the dramatic future facing the tranquil campus that rose on the banks of the San Antonio River. By 1970, the Ursuline Academy had moved away. Then two other groups of determined women--the San Antonio Conservation Society and the Southwest Craft Center--closed...

The Sound of Sunshine: The Story of Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children

Mary McMillan Fisher (author)

Cover for The Sound of Sunshine: The Story of Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children

There were few options for educating deaf children when Dela White discovered in 1945 that her infant daughter, Tuleta, could not hear. Mrs. White took her to Los Angeles to enroll at the John Tracy Clinic, founded by the wife of actor Spencer Tracy and named for their deaf son. Mrs. Tracy was adamant that her son was not going to sign but would hear and speak, recalled Mrs. White. That’s what she wanted for...

The Spanish Acequias of San Antonio

Waynne Cox (author)

Cover for The Spanish Acequias of San Antonio

The Spanish Acequias of San Antonio is the first book on the remarkable Spanish-era acequia system that supplied water to early San Antonio. One of the acequias, serving lands near Mission Espada, remains in use today. Its 1730s stone aqueduct is a major tourist attraction. New towns throughout the semiarid Spanish Southwest depended on water from medieval systems designed by Spanish engineers, using techniques...

The crowning achievement of Waynne Cox's work in archaeology. It is the only definitive text on the irrigation system built by the Spanish in the early 1700s.San Antonio Express-News

The Spanish Missions of San Antonio

Lewis F. Fisher (author)

Cover for The Spanish Missions of San Antonio

San Antonio's five Spanish missions are a national treasure. Built by Franciscan friars on the far frontier of New Spain, they stand today as the largest cluster of Spanish missions in the United States. One is preserved as the Alamo. The others form San Antonio Missions National Historical Park, and the system of all five has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. More than 130 archival and present-day...

A fresh approach to a theme that has been visited often but not always this well. . . . This book is well worth the getting for those interested in mission history and for... — Southwestern Historical Quarterly

Texas Hollywood: Filmmaking in San Antonio since 1910

Frank Thompson (author)

Cover for Texas Hollywood: Filmmaking in San Antonio since 1910

Hundreds of movies have been filmed in San Antonio since the first movie studio in Texas opened in the city in 1910. They range from silent flickers to major Hollywood productions, offbeat independent films, low-budget horror films, and everything in between. Some of historys most honored and loved films have been filmed in San Antonio, including the winner of the first Academy Award for Best Picture. “I much prefer...

The Walk

William deBuys (author)

Cover for The Walk

From Pulitzer Prize finalist William deBuys comes an uncommonly beautiful book—a testament to a particular place and to the horses that inhabit it, all of which help him rediscover hope after the end of a long marriage and the death of a friend. Set, like deBuys’s book River of Traps, on the small farm in a New Mexico mountain valley that the author has tended since 1977, The Walk explores the illuminating ways in...

DeBuys’ pensive and quiet book offers a way out of despair and toward hope.San Francisco Chronicle

Walking Hill Country Towns: 41 Unique Walks in the Texas Hill Country

Diane Capito (author)

Cover for Walking Hill Country Towns: 41 Unique Walks in the Texas Hill Country

Walking Hill Country Towns is the classic guidebook that takes you deep into the hearts of picturesque towns that dot the Texas Hill Country between San Antonio and Austin, from Bandera to Buda, Kerrville to Kyle, Grapetown to Gruene. For those without enough time to slow down, the author keeps the routes on public streets that can be driven or bicycled. You’ll find precise directions plus the locations of convenient...

The most fun was learning about small towns that I had always just whizzed by without a thought or second glance. . . . I find myself putting the book in the car every... — San Antonio Current

WPA Guide to Arizona: The Grand Canyon State

Federal Writers' Project (contributor)

Cover for WPA Guide to Arizona: The Grand Canyon State

During the 1930s in the United States, the Works Progress Administration developed the Federal Writers’ Project to support writers and artists while making a national effort to document the country’s shared history and culture. The WPA Guides to America series consists of individual guides to each of the states. Little-known authors—many of whom later became celebrated literary figures—were commissioned to write these...

WPA Guide to New Mexico: The Colorful State

Federal Writers' Project (contributor)

Cover for WPA Guide to New Mexico: The Colorful State

During the 1930s in the United States, the Works Progress Administration developed the Federal Writers’ Project to support writers and artists while making a national effort to document the country’s shared history and culture. The WPA Guides to America series consists of individual guides to each of the states. Little-known authors—many of whom later became celebrated literary figures—were commissioned to write these...

WPA Guide to Oklahoma: The Sooner State

Federal Writers' Project (contributor)

Cover for WPA Guide to Oklahoma: The Sooner State

During the 1930s in the United States, the Works Progress Administration developed the Federal Writers’ Project to support writers and artists while making a national effort to document the country’s shared history and culture. The WPA Guides to America series consists of individual guides to each of the states. Little-known authors—many of whom later became celebrated literary figures—were commissioned to write these...

WPA Guide to Texas: The Lone Star State

Federal Writers' Project (contributor)

Cover for WPA Guide to Texas: The Lone Star State

During the 1930s in the United States, the Works Progress Administration developed the Federal Writers’ Project to support writers and artists while making a national effort to document the country’s shared history and culture. The WPA Guides to America series consists of individual guides to each of the states. Little-known authors—many of whom later became celebrated literary figures—were commissioned to write these...