Trinity University Press

Lewis F. Fisher

Celebrated San Antonio historian Lewis F. Fisher, whose Maverick Publishing Company was acquired by Trinity University Press in 2015, has published forty-five books on topics ranging from San Antonio’s Spanish heritage to its urban development, and from the military to sports, architecture, and multicultural legends. A former member of the San Antonio River Commission, he has written numerous books himself, recently including Chili Queens, Hay Wagons, and Fandangos: The Spanish Plazas in Frontier San Antonio, winner of a San Antonio Conservation Society 2015 Publication Award, and Saving San Antonio: The Preservation of a Heritage, republished last year in a second edition. Fisher has received numerous local, state and national writing awards and was named a Texas Preservation Hero by the Conservation Society in 2014.

American Venice

In American Venice, Lewis Fisher uncovers the evolution of San Antonio’s beloved River Walk. He shares how San Antonians refused to give up on the vital water source that provided for them from before the city’s beginnings. In 1941 neglect, civic uprisings, and bursts of creativity culminated in the completion of a Works Project Administration undertaking designed by Robert H. H. Hugman. The...

San Antonio's Spanish Missions: A Portrait

Since their construction in the eighteenth century, the Spanish missions of San Antonio have held a fascination for visitors and residents alike. At last, San Antonio’s five colonial missions have been designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO, and this elegant book displays the missions’ cultural glory through more than 100 color photographs by architectural photographer Mike Osborne, along...

Fiesta City

Fiesta City captures San Antonio's centuries old rich celebratory lifestyle. It is a city known for its festivals, celebrations, and rich mix of civil and cultural events. Once the largest city in Texas, from the 1888 San Antonio Fair and International Exposition to Hemisfair in the 1960s, the city has always sought to put itself in the international spotlight. But, day to day, the locals have...

Alamo to Espada

San Antonio's five Spanish missions, including the Alamo, were being pulled from the brink of destruction at the start of the twentieth century, just as picture postcards were coming into vogue. Alamo to Espada profiles the dramatic transformation with more than 150 illustrations and a chapter for each mission. A special section features postcard images showing the variety of ways the Alamo...

Saving San Antonio

Few American cities enjoy the likes of San Antonio's visual links with its dramatic past. The Alamo and four other Spanish missions, recently designated a UNESCO World Heritage site, are the most obvious, but there are countless other landmarks and folkways that lend San Antonio an "odd and antiquated foreignness." Adding to the charm of the nation's seventh largest city is the San Antonio...

Balcones Heights

Residents of suburban Balcones Heights (an enclave of San Antonio, Texas) were incorporated in 1948 to gain zoning protection, only to find themselves relying heavily on revenue from traffic fines to run the city. A few decades later, two interstate highways intersected at Balcones Heights, drawing a regional shopping mall yielding sales tax revenues that could suddenly fund new municipal...

Chili Queens, Hay Wagons, and Fandangos

As San Antonio's frontier era was ending in the 1870s and 1880s, Military Plaza was a vivid outdoor market. By night it was a crowded dining venue where storied chili queens dished out spicy meals and saloons and fandango halls pulsed nearby. A cathedral dating from 1738 faced Main Plaza, where Apache chieftains and Spaniards had long ago buried a hatchet, a lance, six arrows, and a horse to...

Eyes Right!

As the nation undertook the business of winning two world wars, tens of thousands of soldiers and airmen served tours of duty at San Antonio’s major bases. Those times coincided with a surge in picture postcards, which uniquely document the scene. Eyes Right! includes rare photography from the Army’s chase of Pancho Villa along the Mexican border, which San Antonio’s military played an...

No Cause of Offence

Despite the common image of a “Solid South,” many southerners stayed loyal to the Union during the Civil War and coexisted uneasily with their Confederate neighbors. No Cause of Offence is the story of how in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley, Samuel Hance Lewis’s family remained convinced of the Founding Fathers’ wisdom in establishing a single nation. A vast majority of Rockingham County...

River Walk

River Walk untangles the story of the evolution of San Antonio's river into a travel destination for 5 million visitors each year. Of the 230 illustrations, many in color, dozens are historical images never before published. They help document how the river was revived from the sluggish trickle of a century ago to a world-renowned model for river development. Included is the most complete...

San Antonio

San Antonio’s unique appeal is its colorful, authentic past. San Antonio: Outpost of Empires portrays in words and pictures the evolution of the city over nearly three centuries, from the days of the colonists of New Spain to the defense of the Alamo to the rapid growth of the modern era.  Here the faces of people like Davy Crockett, Robert E. Lee, Theodore Roosevelt, Geronimo, and Queen...

San Antonio’s Historic Plazas, Parks, and River Walk

San Antonio enjoys a unique variety of historic public places, from plazas placed in Spanish times to the River Walk, one of the world's most renowned linear parks. In San Antonio’s Historic Plazas, Parks, and River Walk, Lewis F. Fisher organizes 166 full-size vintage postcard images into panoramas displaying the transition of these spaces into modern times. Streetscapes change. Carriages...

The Spanish Missions of San Antonio

San Antonio's five Spanish missions are a national treasure. Built by Franciscan friars on the far frontier of New Spain, they stand today as the largest cluster of Spanish missions in the United States. One is preserved as the Alamo. The others form San Antonio Missions National Historical Park, and the system of all five has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. More than 130...

C. H. Guenther & Son at 150 Years

San Antonio-based C. H. Guenther & Son, founded by a young German immigrant in 1851, is the oldest family-owned business in Texas and the oldest continually operated family-owned milling company in the United States. Evolution from waterwheels to computers and from plain flour to mixes and frozen foods form the backdrop to this lavishly illustrated story of a company whose Pioneer and White...

Saint Mark’s Episcopal Church

How a new congregation of forty Episcopalians struggling against general rowdiness in an isolated frontier outpost of 8,000 inhabitants had the daring to commission Richard Upjohn, the nation’s leading church architect, to design their church—and then to build it. This the start of one of the stories that makes San Antonio such an unusual place. As various denominations worked to establish...

Maverick

By definition, a maverick is a “lone dissenter” who “takes an independent stand apart from his or her associates” or “a person pursuing rebellious, even potentially disruptive policies or ideas.” The word maverick has evolved in the English language from being the term for an unbranded stray calf to a label given to a nontraditional person or to a more extreme “uncontrollable individualist,...

Photo of Lewis F. Fisher